November 25, 2021

Thursday Digest – November

Take a peek at what articles, podcasts, and videos the Mindworx family is enjoying this week!

Take a peek at what articles, podcasts, and videos the Mindworx family is enjoying this week!

From depression to dementia, inflammation is medicine’s new frontier

Dr. Lisa Berman, Mindworx Medical Director and Psychiatrist, is reading about the effects of inflammation on the brain and mental health. Take a look at the article “From depression to dementia, inflammation is medicine’s new frontier” on theguardian.com to learn more.

Why Is Saying ‘No’ So Important?

Maija Garron, Mindworx Care Coordinator, is enjoying an article from Goodtherapy.com that discusses the importance of saying ‘no’ and ways to feel confident in saying no to maintain boundaries in everyday life. Check out these helpful strategies.

Playfulness might be the cure to coronavirus-induced boredom

Victoria Spadaccini, Mindworx Coach, is loving this article from thenewdaily.com highlighting the many ways that playfulness can be a successful solution to pandemic-induced boredom. The article examines multiple studies that have been conducted regarding the correlation between playfulness and life satisfaction.

What Great Listeners Actually Do

Sarah Bogdanski, Director of Coaching and Performance, is paging through the Harvard Business Review and came across the article titled “What Great Listeners Actually Do”, which talks about how being a good listener is more than just remaining silent while others are talking. This helpful article gives insight on the type of questions, interactions, and conversations that occur when someone is a great listener.

It’s not stress that’s killing us, it’s hate: Maybe mindfulness can help

Cecily Crow, Mindworx Coach, recently read, “It’s not stress that’s killing us, it’s hate: Maybe mindfulness can help.” This article researches the different ways that people view and practice mindfulness to manage their feelings of stress and discomfort. It suggests that individuals might not fully understand the two-part experience that mindfulness should be, awareness & acceptance, and instead do one or the other.